Heads UP! Early October

The Moon moves from right to left across the constellations in early October.

From right to left: Moon (with Earthshine), Saturn, Mars (Antares 'anti-Mars' is just outside the photo, to the left).

From right to left: Moon, Saturn, Mars (Antares ‘anti-Mars’ is just outside the photo, to the left).

Saturn is heading into the solar glare later this month. Mars is still moving to the left across the constellations, as well, but not as fast as the Moon.
Jupiter is moving higher in the morning sky. Venus is almost gone from the morning sky, moving behind the Sun. Venus spent a long time slowly moving lower in the morning sky; it will take a very long time to move out into the evening sky in December.
Venus is the bright object in the SOHO satellite C3 camera.

Venus is the bright object in the SOHO satellite C3 camera.


Venus will be in the C3 camera for all of October. Mercury will join Venus at mid-month.
Here’s the link to the C3 camera… http://sohowww.nascom.nasa.gov/data/realtime/c3/512/

While we’re at it, here’s the Moon through the telescope last Saturday night (Sept. 27th)

Young crescent moon.  Just imagine yourself flying over the crescent!

Young crescent moon. Just imagine yourself flying over the crescent! Click to make it superlarge! Note the rough ‘terrain’ along the lit edge. In this case they are caused by turbulence from the warm parking lot.

Back in the evening sky all the bright planet action is low in the southwest. How low can you go and still see Saturn’s rings in your telescope? Saturn sets during the middle of evening twilight by the end of the month. Mars craftily avoids the solar glare, sneaking past the Scorpion and hiding in the Teapot of Sagittarius.

The Great Square of Pegasus rises high in the evening Prime Time sky, dragging M31, the Andromeda Galaxy, with it. The Milky Way stretches from the northeast to southwest, passing north of overhead after evening twilight ends. Someday, a couple of billion years from now, Andromeda will be close enough to look like a second Milky Way in our skies.

Look to the upper left for the faint smudge - the Andromeda Galaxy .  Find your way to it from the left star in the Square of Pegasus.

Look to the upper left for the faint smudge – the Andromeda Galaxy . Find your way to it from the left star in the Square of Pegasus.

The Pleiades lead the Hyades into the midnight and morning sky, followed by Orion which rises well before dawn, warning us of the coming of winter. The Orionid meteor shower peaks on the 21st. It doesn’t have much Moonshine to contend with, but it’s a small shower, adding a few meteors to the morning sky on the 21st.

Pleiades rising late Saturday night.

Pleiades rising late Saturday night.

The International Space Station gives us an alternative bright object to see in the evening twilight sky from the 4th through the 29th.

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