Heads UP! Big East Coast Storm Sunday night to blot out the wonderful night skies

There is so much to say about what is happening in the evening sky – so we’ll just make this note shorter by having a major east coast storm blot out our skies for the weekend and keep skies mucky for the following week!

What snow lovers wouldn’t have given for this storm a few months ago!  A low forms in the Gulf of Mexico, moves up the east coast, and is met by a shot of cold air and additional energy.

So we start with rain on Sunday, becoming heavy overnight, with strong winds later Sunday after noon and early Sunday night (potentially sustained 30 MPH, gusts to 50.  Then the cold air wraps around the storm on Monday, pushing a cold front through early Monday from the southwest.  The front could be accompanied by heavy showers and thunderstorms.

Those who put their arks away during our recent dry spell will need to watch out for significant flooding Sunday night if we get the 2 1/2 to 3 1/2 inches or more of rain.  Thus says the Weather Service:

MAIN STEM RIVERS
SHOULD NOT HAVE ANY PROBLEMS...BUT SMALL STREAM AND SIGNIFICANT
URBAN/POOR DRAINAGE ARE POSSIBLE. HARD DRY GROUND DUE TO LACK OF
RECENT RAINFALL...AND STORM DRAINS THAT HAVE NOT YET BEEN
CLEARED OF WINTER DEBRIS...MAY ACTUALLY CONTRIBUTE TO RUNOFF IN
THESE AREAS. THIS RAIN WILL HELP ALLEVIATE THE MODERATE TO
SEVERE DROUGHT CONDITIONS.

Just so astronomers don’t feel left out – the recent new moon will help raise higher than normal tides, despite the moon being near it furthest away from us for the year.

Then the storm gets so tangled up that it trips over itself and stumbles over northeastern Pennsylvania late Monday, getting dizzy as it pushes moisture around it and over us for a few days of occasional showers until a new high pressure system gets tired of waiting around and pushes the unsettled weather out of our around Friday. 

So next weekend might be nice for the solar telescopes at the Northeast Astronomy Forum at Rockland Community College.

Here’s a map of simulated weather radar, with the heaviest rain, in yellow, over us near midnight Sunday night/Monday morning.

Image

 

From the NOAA National Environmental Prediction Center at
http://mag.ncep.noaa.gov/NCOMAGWEB/appcontroller

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